American Hungers

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Author: Gavin Jones
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400831913
Size: 65.98 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 248
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Social anxiety about poverty surfaces with startling frequency in American literature. Yet, as Gavin Jones argues, poverty has been denied its due as a critical and ideological framework in its own right, despite recent interest in representations of the lower classes and the marginalized. These insights lay the groundwork for American Hungers, in which Jones uncovers a complex and controversial discourse on the poor that stretches from the antebellum era through the Depression. Reading writers such as Herman Melville, Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton, James Agee, and Richard Wright in their historical contexts, Jones explores why they succeeded where literary critics have fallen short. These authors acknowledged a poverty that was as aesthetically and culturally significant as it was socially and materially real. They confronted the ideological dilemmas of approaching poverty while giving language to the marginalized poor--the beggars, tramps, sharecroppers, and factory workers who form a persistent segment of American society. Far from peripheral, poverty emerges at the center of national debates about social justice, citizenship, and minority identity. And literature becomes a crucial tool to understand an economic and cultural condition that is at once urgent and elusive because it cuts across the categories of race, gender, and class by which we conventionally understand social difference. Combining social theory with literary analysis, American Hungers masterfully brings poverty into the mainstream critical idiom.


Works Later Works Black Boy American Hunger The Outsider

Works  Later works  Black boy  American hunger    The outsider PDF
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Author: Richard Wright
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 32.37 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : African Americans
Languages : en
Pages :
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Richard Wright S Black Boy American Hunger

Richard Wright s Black Boy  American Hunger  PDF
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Author: William L. Andrews
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195157729
Size: 61.50 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 210
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This casebook reprints a selection of important and representative reviews, criticism and scholarly analysis of Richard Wright's 'Black Boy (American Hunger): A Record of Childhood and Youth' (1991).


American Hunger

American Hunger PDF
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Author: Eli Saslow
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 1101873892
Size: 68.68 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 64
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Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting In this Pulitzer Prize-winning collection, Washington Post reporter Eli Saslow traveled across the country over the course of a year—from Florida and Texas to Rhode Island and Tennessee—to examine the personal and political implications and repercussions of America's growing food stamp program. Saslow shows us the extraordinary impact the arrival of food stamps has each month on a small town's struggling economy, the difficult choices our representatives face in implementing this $78-billion program affecting millions of Americans, and the challenges American families, senior citizens, and children encounter every day in ensuring they have enough, and sometimes even anything to eat. These unsettling and eye-opening stories make for required reading, providing nuance and understanding to the complex matters of American poverty. An eBook short.


Scientific Americans

Scientific Americans PDF
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Author: John Bruni
Publisher: University of Wales Press
ISBN: 1783160187
Size: 67.58 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 272
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Demonstrating the timely relevance of Theodore Dreiser, Edith Wharton, Jack London and Henry Adams, this book shows how debates about evolution, identity, and a shifting world picture have uncanny parallels with the emerging global systems that shape our own lives. Tracing these systems' take-off point in the early twentieth century through the lens of popular science journalism, John Bruni makes a valuable contribution to the study of how biopolitical control over life created boundaries among races, classes, genders and species. Rather than accept that these writers get their scientific ideas about evolution second-hand, filtered through a social Darwinist ideology, this study argues that they actively determine what evolution means. Furthermore, the book, examines the ecological concerns that naturalist narratives reflect - such as land and water use, waste management, and environmental pollution - previously unaddressed in a book-length study.


American Hunger

American Hunger PDF
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Author: Richard Wright
Publisher: New York : Harper & Row
ISBN:
Size: 52.74 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : African Americans
Languages : en
Pages : 146
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A continuation of Richard Wright's autobiography, "Black Boy."


Modernism And The Practice Of Proletarian Literature

Modernism and the Practice of Proletarian Literature PDF
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Author: Simon Cooper
Publisher: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3030351955
Size: 47.69 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 338
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This book tests critical reassessments of US radical writing of the 1930s against recent developments in theories of modernism and the avant-garde. Multidisciplinary in approach, it considers poetry, fiction, classical music, commercial art, jazz, and popular contests (such as dance marathons and bingo). Relating close readings to social and economic contexts over the period 1856–1952, it centers in on a key author or text in each chapter, providing an unfolding, chronological narrative, while at the same time offering nuanced updates on existing debates. Part One focuses on the roots of the 1930s proletarian movement in poetry and music of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Part Two analyzes the output of proletarian novelists, considered alongside contemporaneous works by established modernist authors as well as more mainstream, popular titles.


American Literature In Transition 1940 1950

American Literature in Transition  1940   1950 PDF
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Author: Christopher Vials
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108548601
Size: 66.11 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages :
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In the aftermath of World War II, the United States emerged as the dominant imperial power, and in US popular memory, the Second World War is remembered more vividly than the American Revolution. American Literature in Transition, 1940–1950 provides crucial contexts for interpreting the literature of this period. Essays from scholars in literature, history, art history, ethnic studies, and American studies show how writers intervened in the global struggles of the decade: the Second World War, the Cold War, and emerging movements over racial justice, gender and sexuality, labor, and de-colonization. One recurrent motif is the centrality of the political impulse in art and culture. Artists and writers participated widely in left and liberal social movements that fundamentally transformed the terms of social life in the twentieth century, not by advocating specific legislation, but by changing underlying cultural values. This book addresses all the political impulses fueling art and literature at the time, as well as the development of new forms and media, from modernism and noir to radio and the paperback.


The Politics And Aesthetics Of Hunger And Disgust

The Politics and Aesthetics of Hunger and Disgust PDF
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Author: Michel Delville
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1315472201
Size: 26.85 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 238
View: 1949

This study examines how hunger narratives and performances contribute to a reconsideration of neglected or prohibited domains of thinking which only a full confrontation with the body’s heterogeneity and plasticity can reveal. From literary motif or psychosomatic symptom to revolutionary gesture or existential malady, the double crux of hunger and disgust is a powerful force which can define the experience of embodiment. Kafka’s fable of the "Hunger Artist" offers a matrix for the fast, while its surprising last-page revelation introduces disgust as a correlative of abstinence, conscious or otherwise. Grounded in Kristeva’s theory of abjection, the figure of the fraught body lurking at the heart of the negative grotesque gathers precision throughout this study, where it is employed in a widening series of contexts: suicide through overeating, starvation as self-performance or political resistance, the teratological versus the totalitarian, the anorexic harboring of death. In the process, writers and artists as diverse as Herman Melville, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Christina Rossetti, George Orwell, Knut Hamsun, J.M. Coetzee, Cindy Sherman, Pieter Breughel, Marina Abramovic, David Nebreda, Paul McCarthy, and others are brought into the discussion. By looking at the different acts of visceral, affective, and ideological resistance performed by the starving body, this book intensifies the relationship between hunger and disgust studies while offering insight into the modalities of the "dark grotesque" which inform the aesthetics and politics of hunger. It will be of value to anyone interested in the culture, politics, and subjectivity of embodiment, and scholars working within the fields of disgust studies, food studies, literary studies, cultural theory, and media studies.